Penguin Classics

Filters
Done
  • Placeholder
    £8.99

    After attending a séance, Maskull finds himself embarking on a journey to the planet Tormance, which orbits Arcturus. Alone, he wanders the startling landscape, encountering new monsters at every turn, constantly seeking the truth about the divinity known as Shaping, Surtur and Crystalman.

  • Placeholder
    £8.99

    The last of Kavan’s books to be published in her lifetime, ‘Ice’ is a dreamy novel set in an imaginary world padded by ice and snow, run by a secret government, invaded by aggressors, and threatened with nuclear destruction.

  • By Len Deighton
    £9.99

    The dead hand of a long-defeated Nazi Third Reich reaches out to Portugal, London and Marrakech in Deighton’s novel, featuring the same anonymous narrator and milieu of ‘The Ipcress File’.

  • By Len Deighton
    £9.99

    Set in Berlin, this novel tells of the selling of an important Russian scientist to the West. But the unnamed hero soon discovers that behind the facade of a mock funeral lies a game of deadly manoeuvres and ruthless tactics.

  • By Len Deighton
    £9.99

    After having been recruited by Harvey Newbegin, the narrator travels from the bone-freezing winter of Helsinki, Riga and Leningrad, to the stifling heat of Texas, and soon finds himself tangling with enemies on both sides of the Iron Curtain.

  • By Kjell Askildsen
    £9.99

    Spare, taut and told with flashes of pitch-black humour, the short stories of Norwegian master Kjell Askildsen capture all the strangeness of modern existence. In this selection of tales, spanning the whole of his brilliant career, unnerving encounters occur, lonely individuals try to connect, families and relationships are fractured, and we are confronted by the fragility and absurdity of life.

  • By Frantz Fanon
    £9.99

    Frantz Fanon’s seminal text was immediately acclaimed as a classic of black liberationalist writing. Fanon’s descriptions of the feelings of inadequacy and dependence experienced by people of colour in a white world, ‘the crippled colonial mentalities of the oppressed’, are as salient and as compelling as ever.

  • By O. Henry
    £7.99

    One of the most popular American writers of the twentieth century, O. Henry’s comic eye and unique, playful approach to the rough material of life’s realities are unmatched. These stories, which range from the cattle-lands of Texas to the bars of New York, highlight the joys of avoiding habit and convention, and demonstrate O. Henry’s mastery of speech and place.

  • By Philip Hensher
    £25.00

    The quarter century or so before the outbreak of the First World War saw an extraordinary boom in the popularity and quality of short stories in Britain. Fuelled by a large new magazine readership and vigorous competition to acquire new stories and develop the careers of some of our greatest writers, these years were ones where the normal rule-of-thumb (novels sell, short stories don’t) was inverted.This was the era of Sherlock Holmes, of Kipling’s most famous stories, of M. R. James, Katherine Mansfield and Joyce’s ‘Dubliners’.

  • Placeholder
    £5.99

    Taken from his ‘Collection of Sand’, these essays are not great ideas in themselves but commentaries on great ideas and the physical remains they have left behind them: astonishing objects and human-made places which have encapsulated different senses of wonder and desire. The essays range from fire-temples to world-changing maps, from automata to ancient cities. And, not least, the great enigma that has sat at the heart of Rome for some 1,900 years: Trajan’s Column.

  • Placeholder
    £5.99

    How can one live well in the world? What does it mean to be happy? In this selection, Aristotle probes the nature of happiness and virtue in a quest to divine an ethical value system. Exploring ideas of community, responsibility, courage, friendship, agency, reasoning, desire and pleasure, these are some of the most profound and lasting ancient writings on the self to have influenced Western thought.

  • Placeholder
    £4.99

    Widely regarded as the father of modern Western philosophy, Descartes sought to look beyond established ideas and create a thought system based on reason. In this work he meditates on doubt, the human soul, God, truth and the nature of existence itself.

  • Placeholder
    £4.99

    In this collection of wise, witty and fascinating essays, Borges discusses the existence of Hell, the flaws in English literary detectives, the philosophy of contradictions, and more. Varied and enthralling, these pieces examine the very nature of our lives, from cinema and books to history and religion.

  • Placeholder
    £5.99

    This volume gathers together some of Charles Baudelaire’s most important critical writings. It provides a stimulating survey of important ideas and individuals in the critical world of the great poet who has been called the father of modern criticism.

  • Placeholder
    £5.99

    Since its first publication in 1859, few works of political philosophy have provoked such continuous controversy as Mill’s ‘On Liberty’, a passionate argument on behalf of freedom of self-expression. This edition contains an introduction which puts the work in its biographical and political context.