Social & cultural history

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  • By Kate Morgan
    £16.99

    THE CRIMES. THE STORIES. THE LAW

    ‘Fascinating’ – Sunday Times

    ‘Masterful’ – Judith Flanders

    ‘A page-turning read’ – Prof. David Wilson

    Totally gripping and brilliantly told, Murder: The Biography is a gruesome and utterly captivating portrait of the legal history of murder.

  • By Christina Lamb
    £9.99

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE BAILLIE GIFFORD PRIZE FOR NON-FICTION 2020

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE ORWELL PRIZE 2021

    A Times and Sunday Times Best Book of 2020

    ‘A wake-up call ? These women’s stories will make you weep, and then rage at the world’s indifference.’ Amal Clooney

  • By Dylan Taylor-Lehman
    £9.99

    The raucous, stranger-than-fiction tale of Sealand – the tiny island nation off the Suffolk coast.

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    £10.99

    A Times and Sunday Times Best Book of 2020

    ‘Radical Wordsworth deserves to take its place as the finest modern introduction to his work, life and impact’ Financial Times

    ‘Richly repays reading ? It is hard to think of another poet who has changed our world so much’ Sunday Times

  • By Helena Attlee
    £20.00

    From the moment she hears Lev’s violin for the first time, Helena Attlee is captivated. She is told that it is an Italian instrument, named after its former Russian owner. Eager to discover all she can about its ancestry, and the stories contained within its delicate wooden body, she sets out for its birthplace, Cremona, once the hometown of famous luthier Antonio Stradivari. This is the beginning of a beguiling journey whose end she could never have anticipated.

  • By Saidiya V. Hartman
    £10.99

    At the dawn of the 20th century, black women in the US were carving out new ways of living. The first generations born after emancipation, their struggle was to live as if they really were free. These women refused to labour like slaves. Wrestling with the question of freedom, they invented forms of love and solidarity outside convention and law. These were the pioneers of free love, common-law and transient marriages, queer identities, and single motherhood – all deemed scandalous, even pathological, at the dawn of the 20th century, though they set the pattern for the world to come. Saidiya Hartman deploys both radical scholarship and profound literary intelligence to examine the transformation of intimate life that they instigated. With visionary intensity, she conjures their worlds, their dilemmas, their defiant brilliance.

  • By Jeremy Atherton Lin
    £16.99

    ‘Gay Bar’ is a sparkling, richly individual history of the gay bars of London, San Francisco and Los Angeles, focusing on the post-AIDs crisis years of the 1990s to the present day. It is also the story of Jeremy Atherton Lin’s own experiences as a gay man, and the lifelong romance that began one restless night in Soho. In prose both playful and challenging, he immerses his reader in the unique experience of a life lived in and out of these spaces.

  • By Juliet Nicolson
    £18.99

    On Boxing Day 1962, when Juliet Nicolson was eight years old, the snow began to fall. It did not stop for ten weeks. It was one of the coldest and harshest winters for 300 years. The drifts in East Sussex reached twenty-three feet. In London, milkmen made deliveries on skis. On Dartmoor 2,000 ponies were buried in the snow, and foxes ate sheep alive. It wasn’t just the weather that was bad. The threat of nuclear war had reached its terrifying height with the recent Cuban Missile Crisis. Unemployment was on the rise, de Gaulle was blocking Britain from joining the European Economic Community, Winston Churchill, still the symbol of Great Britishness, was fading. These shadows hung over a country paralysed by frozen heating oil, burst pipes and power cuts which are explored here.

  • By Sophy Roberts
    £10.99

    Siberia’s story is traditionally one of exiles, penal colonies and unmarked graves. Yet there is another tale to tell. Dotted throughout this remote land are pianos – grand instruments created during the boom years of the 19th century, and humble, Soviet-made uprights that found their way into equally modest homes. They tell the story of how, ever since entering Russian culture under the influence of Catherine the Great, piano music has run through the country like blood. How these pianos travelled into this snow-bound wilderness in the first place is testament to noble acts of fortitude by governors, adventurers and exiles. That stately instruments might still exist in such a hostile landscape is remarkable. That they are still capable of making music in far-flung villages is nothing less than a miracle. But this is Siberia, where people can endure the worst of the world.

  • By Kerri n? Dochartaigh
    £14.99

    Kerri ní Dochartaigh was born in Derry, Northern Ireland, at the very height of the Troubles. She was brought up on a grey and impoverished council estate on the wrong side of town. But for her family, and many others, there was no right side. One parent was Catholic, the other was Protestant. In the space of one year they were forced out of two homes and when she was eleven a homemade petrol bomb was thrown through her bedroom window. Terror was in the very fabric of the city, and for families like Kerri’s, the ones who fell between the cracks of identity, it seemed there was no escape. In ‘Thin Places’, a mixture of memoir, history and nature writing, Kerri explores how nature kept her sane and helped her heal, how violence and poverty are never more than a stone’s throw from beauty and hope, and how we are, once again, allowing our borders to become hard, and terror to creep back in.

  • By Eric Watt
    £12.99

    Eric Watt’s photographic legacy reveals how the cityscape has changed in the five decades in which he worked, capturing much of Glasgow’s social history, its citizens and streets. Featuring black and white and colour images, this book has commentary putting the social history of Glasgow into context, alongside captions for each image. It is published to coincide with an exhibition of Eric Watt’s work at Kelvingrove Art Gallery & Museum during 2020/21.

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    £9.99

    ‘The Hidden Ways’ wanders Scotland’s forgotten paths to tell an alternative history of Scotland and our place within its landscape.