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  • By Rosa Rankin-Gee
    £14.99

    Dreamland is a postcard from a future Britain that’s closer than we think.

  • By Madeleine Ryan
    £14.99

    A young woman gets ready to go to a party. She arrives, feels overwhelmed, leaves, and then returns. Minutely attuned to the people who come into her view, and alternating between alienation and profound connection, she is hilarious, self-aware, sometimes acerbic, and painfully honest. And by the end of the night, she’s shown us something radical about love, loss, and the need to belong.

  • By Te-Ping Chen
    £14.99

    A dazzling debut collection which, deftly and urgently, tells the stories of those living in the biggest and most complicated country on earth.?

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  • By Paul Yoon
    £8.99

    From award-winning author Paul Yoon comes a beautiful, aching novel about three kids orphaned in 1960s Laos-and how their destinies are entwined across decades, anointed by Hernan Diaz as, “one of those rare novels that stays with us to become a standard with which we measure other books.”

  • By Nam-ju Cho
    £8.99

    Kim Jiyoung is a girl born to a mother whose in-laws wanted a boy. Kim Jiyoung is a sister made to share a room while her brother gets one of his own. Kim Jiyoung is a female preyed upon by male teachers at school. Kim Jiyoung is a daughter whose father blames her when she is harassed late at night. Kim Jiyoung is a good student who doesn’t get put forward for internships. Kim Jiyoung is a model employee but gets overlooked for promotion. Kim Jiyoung is a wife who gives up her career and independence for a life of domesticity. Kim Jiyoung has started acting strangely. Kim Jiyoung is depressed. Kim Jiyoung is mad. Kim Jiyoung is her own woman. Kim Jiyoung is every woman.

  • By Rebecca Giggs
    £20.00

    This is a meditation on the awe-inspiring lives of whales, revealing what they can teach us about ourselves, our planet, and our relationship to other species.

  • By Maria Dahvana Headley
    £9.99

    A man seeks to prove himself as a hero. A monster seeks silence in his territory. A warrior seeks to avenge her murdered son. A dragon ends it all. This radical new feminist verse translation of ‘Beowulf’ by Maria Dahvana Headley brings to light elements that have never before been translated into English. The familiar elements of the epic poem are seen with a novelist’s eye toward gender, genre, and history – it has always been a tale of entitlement and encroachment, powerful men seeking to become more powerful, and one woman seeking justice for her child, but this version brings new context to an old story. While crafting her contemporary adaptation of ‘Beowulf’, Headley unearthed significant shifts lost over centuries, transforming the binary narrative of monsters and heroes into a thrilling tale in which the two categories often entwine.

  • By Jonathan Carr
    £9.99

    It is 1800. On desolate, marshy ground between Lake Michigan and the Illinois River, a man builds a house and a city is born. This debut novel follows Chicago’s tumultuous first century, evoking how a city is made: by a succession of vivid, sometimes villainous individuals and their cumulative invention, energy and vision.