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  • By Souvankham Thammavongsa
    £8.99

    In her stunning debut, Souvankham Thammavongsa captures the day-to-day lives of immigrants and refugees in a nameless city, illuminating hopes, disappointments, love affairs, and above all, the pursuit of a place to belong.

  • By Frances Leviston
    £9.99

    Ten women, all called Claire, are tangled up in complex power dynamics with their families, friends and lovers. Though all are different ages, and leading different lives, each is haunted by the difficulty of living on her own terms, and by her capacity to harm and be harmed. Claire is a teenaged babysitter left alone with a strange little girl and her imaginary friend. She is a woman trying to escape her elderly mother by employing an android carer. Claire is a young TV journalist wrecking her first big interview. Claire’s boyfriend discovers more than he bargains for when he begins to read her diary. And no matter her age or background, Claire is living in the shadow of a monstrous mother.

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    £14.99

    Set in the fictional African village of Kosawa, ‘How Beautiful We Were’ tells the story of a people living in fear amidst environmental degradation wrought by an American oil company. Pipeline spills have rendered farmlands infertile. Children are dying from drinking toxic water. Promises of clean-up and financial reparations to the villagers are made – and ignored. The country’s government, led by a brazen dictator, exists to serve its own interest only. Left with few choices, the people of Kosawa decide to fight back. But their fight will come at a steep price, one which generation after generation will have to pay.

  • By Shokoofeh Azar
    £8.99

    A family story about the unbreakable connection between the living and the dead

  • By Annie Ernaux
    £8.99

    In her spare, stark style, Annie Ernaux’s Simple Passion documents the desires and indignities of a human heart ensnared in an all-consuming passion.

  • By Maria Dahvana Headley
    £9.99

    A man seeks to prove himself as a hero. A monster seeks silence in his territory. A warrior seeks to avenge her murdered son. A dragon ends it all. This radical new feminist verse translation of ‘Beowulf’ by Maria Dahvana Headley brings to light elements that have never before been translated into English. The familiar elements of the epic poem are seen with a novelist’s eye toward gender, genre, and history – it has always been a tale of entitlement and encroachment, powerful men seeking to become more powerful, and one woman seeking justice for her child, but this version brings new context to an old story. While crafting her contemporary adaptation of ‘Beowulf’, Headley unearthed significant shifts lost over centuries, transforming the binary narrative of monsters and heroes into a thrilling tale in which the two categories often entwine.

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    £8.99

    Following the publication ‘In My Mind’s Eye’, her acclaimed first volume of diaries, Jan Morris continued to write her daily musings. From her home in the North West of Wales, the author of classics such as Venice and Trieste cast her eye over modern life in all its stupidity and glory. From her daily thousand paces to the ongoing troubles of Brexit, from her enduring love for America to the wonders of the natural world, and from the vagaries and ailments of old age to the beauty of youth, she once again displays her determined belief in embracing life and creativity – all kindness and marmalade.

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    £8.99

    Tambudzai’s opportunity for education comes only after the death of her brother. Moving to the mission school, her critical faculties develop rapidly, and become focused not just on her studies but also on the men and women of her family.

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    £8.99

    ‘The Quarry’ is a collection of interconnected short stories set in the fictional, working class, West London based Quarry Lane estate. The characters and settings reappear as themes of ambition, addiction and social mobility are examined in this state-of-the-nation book. The stories focus on a diverse collection of working class men and considers the concept of masculinity in a world where gender and gender roles are being revolutionised.

  • By Saidiya V. Hartman
    £10.99

    At the dawn of the 20th century, black women in the US were carving out new ways of living. The first generations born after emancipation, their struggle was to live as if they really were free. These women refused to labour like slaves. Wrestling with the question of freedom, they invented forms of love and solidarity outside convention and law. These were the pioneers of free love, common-law and transient marriages, queer identities, and single motherhood – all deemed scandalous, even pathological, at the dawn of the 20th century, though they set the pattern for the world to come. Saidiya Hartman deploys both radical scholarship and profound literary intelligence to examine the transformation of intimate life that they instigated. With visionary intensity, she conjures their worlds, their dilemmas, their defiant brilliance.

  • By Helen Lewis
    £8.99

    Well-behaved women don’t make history: difficult women do. Helen Lewis argues that feminism’s success is down to complicated, contradictory, imperfect women, who fought each other as well as fighting for equal rights. Too many of these pioneers have been whitewashed or forgotten in our modern search for feel-good, inspirational heroines. It’s time to reclaim the history of feminism as a history of difficult women. In this book, you’ll meet the working-class suffragettes who advocated bombings and arson; the princess who discovered why so many women were having bad sex; the pioneer of the refuge movement who became a men’s rights activist; the ‘striker in a sari’ who terrified Margaret Thatcher; the wronged Victorian wife who definitely wasn’t sleeping with the prime minister; and the lesbian politician who outraged the country.

  • By Hadley Freeman
    £9.99

    The Sunday Times bestseller

    ‘An utterly engrossing book’ Nigella Lawson

    ‘Remarkable and gripping’ Edmund de Waal

    ‘A near-perfect study of Jewish identity in the 20th century ? I don’t hesitate to call it a masterpiece’ Telegraph

  • By Robbie Morrison
    £14.99

    Edge of the Grave is the first novel in a historical crime series set against the backdrop of 1930s Glasgow. For fans of William McIlvanney’s Laidlaw, Denise Mina and Philip Kerr.

  • By Jeremy Atherton Lin
    £16.99

    ‘Gay Bar’ is a sparkling, richly individual history of the gay bars of London, San Francisco and Los Angeles, focusing on the post-AIDs crisis years of the 1990s to the present day. It is also the story of Jeremy Atherton Lin’s own experiences as a gay man, and the lifelong romance that began one restless night in Soho. In prose both playful and challenging, he immerses his reader in the unique experience of a life lived in and out of these spaces.

  • By Naoise Dolan
    £8.99

    Ava, newly arrived in Hong Kong from Dublin, spends her days teaching English to rich children. Julian is a banker. A banker who likes to spend money on Ava, to have sex and discuss fluctuating currencies with her. But when she asks whether he loves her, he cannot say more than ‘I like you a great deal’. Enter Edith, a lawyer. Refreshingly enthusiastic and unapologetically earnest, Edith takes Ava to the theatre when Julian leaves Hong Kong for work. Quickly, she becomes something Ava looks forward to. And then Julian writes to tell Ava he is coming back to Hong Kong. Should Ava return to the easy compatibility of her life with Julian or take a leap into the unknown with Edith?

  • By Christopher Brookmyre
    £18.99

    Millie Spark can kill anyone. A special effects make-up artist, her talent is to create realistic scenes of bloody violence. Then, one day, she wakes to find her lover dead in her bed. 25 years later, her sentence for murder served, Millicent is ready to give up on her broken life – until she meets troubled film student and reluctant petty thief Jerry. Together, they begin to discover that all was not what it seemed on that fateful night – and someone doesn’t want them to find out why.